Peak Geology

Peak Geology

Geology rocks!

 
Use our accessible guide to the geology of the Peak District to explore millions of years of history in beautiful settings.  Caves and crags, mountains and valleys, industrial history and SSSIs – the Peak District has it all.  So whether climbing or caving, minerals, or simply admiring great views turns you on, you’ll find something to tickle your fancy in the Peaks.
A picture of Fluorite crystals
 

Diversity in your face!

The Peak District wears many faces. Experience its geological diversity in the six areas we’ve chosen to show how our land was formed – and how that affects the ways we live now.
A picture of Castleton, Hope and Edale
 

Underground, overground

Drystone walls and stone-built villages characterize the Peak District National Park. Look out for different colours and textures of stone. See how walls follow the contours of the land and houses cluster in flat valley bottoms or cling lonely to steep hillsides. You will discover ghostly abandoned millstone works, mining remains and the hollows and mounds of ancient quarrying and agricultural field clearance.
A picture of Deep blue fluorite crystals

Animal, vegetable or mineral?

Even animals and plants depend on the rocks for life. Geology decides whether the land is wet or dry, windy or sheltered, fertile or sparse, woods, grass or heather moorlands. So no geology, no Park!
A picture of Ammonites

Dark Peak – White Peak

The rough gritstones of the Dark Peak surround on three sides the limestone White Peak.  Once a tropical sea, with magnificent coral reefs and red-hot lava flows, the White Peak still hides its depths.  Visit the show caves at Castleton, and leave the miles of intricate underground networks to experienced cavers.  Explore the dramatic peaty high moorlands of the Dark Peak and classic dales woodlands and farm country of the White.  
A picture of the dark peak    A picture of the white peak

Touch but don’t take!

Please treat our land with respect. It has taken millions of years to form and is home to rare and shy creatures. Follow the rights of way, and enjoy your visit!

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